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ENCHANTÉ : SHIVER SNICKER SCHMOOZE IS PUBLISHED

Hello! SHIVER SNICKER SCHMOOZE IS PUBLISHED!

To get your fun book (for only $6.99 or equivalent): click on the following link:

https://amzn.to/2Km0Rt0

A glimpse of the 12 stories:

The Flatfooters reflects my exchanges with friends in and from the broader Middle East and my fears that something like this might happen when driving home in fierce sunlight on I-95 south. (SHIVER)

Ghana-The Burial Train of Mr. Ashok resulted from a pressure cooker Algonkian Writers Conference with Michael Neff (recommended). (SNICKER)

Killing The Elephant Poacher is based on my World Bank work in the Central African Republic and a first step to developing a Boutique Killer assassin series. (SHIVER)

Leave Flying To The Birds came from a bad landing while piloting a small plane. (SHIVER/SNICKER)

From the Horse’s Mouth is how my horse felt about my horsewoman instructor. (SNICKER)

Mother Centipede was inspired by Kafka’s Metamorphosis and Stephen King’s Just After Sunset. (SHIVER)

The Mice Patrol and Attic Ghosts Talking are tales of mice and squirrels in our household and were sparked by reading Mark Spencer’s wonderful book Ghost Walking. (SNICKER)

Chantal’s Baby Grand really happened but don’t tell anybody it was me. (SCHMOOZE)

The Heliphone is based on bad dreams as you can imagine if you know my Double Dutch life. (SNICKER/SCHMOOZE)

The Medium stems from my younger days when I lived irresponsibly and had to apologize to a revered baroness whom my family and the entire country knew. (SNICKER/SCHMOOZE)

The Train Rider is a tragicomedy, remembering a society friend I played tennis with during my youth in Holland and whom I tragically found riding in the train gone mad. (SNICKER)

ENJOY!

Links of other books for winter and dark days: 

https://amzn.to/2IwinKc  Francine – Dazzling Daughter of the Mountain State: Corporate scheming and love.

https://amzn.to/35mgEkv

Enchanting The Swan: Classical music and musicians muddied in banking fraud, murder, and…love.

Get them now in paperback or Kindle. Or great gifts for Sinterklaas (Holland) and Christmas ( Everywhere).

 

 

 

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ENCHANTÉ – New Book Coming

A short story book is on its way to entertain you.

On writing stories: I came to the conclusion several years ago that the best way to learn the craft is to start writing short stories. Short stories like novels must have a beginning, a middle and an end, the end usually following shortly after the middle.  I composed Some Woman I Have Known (Koehler Books 2015/Sun Hill Books 2018) from memoir-short stories about my diddle daddling in love until I married, and some outstanding women I met. It got me a PAN membership at Romance Writers of America. An honorary spot for a guy among all the famous and good women-writers.

Now I am launching a short storybook, entitled Shiver, Snicker, Schmooze, which contains 12 short stories in various genres, some short-short, others somewhat longer, which my muse bubbled up for me and got my fingers hitting the keyboard. Some based on real-life, others on the after-life, brought forward to the present time, spawning a smile, a tear, a shiver, or a schmooze. To entertain you during a boring train ride, that awful waiting in the airport lounge or sitting comfortably by the fireplace.

Soon to come:

ENCHANTÉ will announce when the Short Story Book is available on Amazon.com.

COVER DESIGN BY MELANIE STEPHENS OF  MS Illustrations (Frederiksburg VA)

Till soon,

John

https://www.johnschwartzauthor.com/books/

https://johnschwartzauthor.com

www.amazon.com/author/schwartzjohn

https://johnschwartzauthor.com/blog

http://www.facebook.com/johnschwartzauthor

 

 

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ENCHANTÉ-ATTIC GHOSTS TALKING

Squirrels Charlie and Charlene got fed up with their leaking roof in the sycamore tree and decided to find a better home for their upcoming babies. The nearby shed in their yard was too low, and the pine-oak they used to hang out in was removed by those unsocial humans they had to put up with. The sycamore tree had one advantage, though: a branch reaching to the humans’ roof.

“Come on Charlene,” Charlie said one early morning, shaking off raindrops from his tail. “Let’s go over there and take a look. Maybe we’ll find a hole somewhere.”

Charlene found this a great idea. The two rushed over the branch and hopped on the roof, the branch still waving up and down after they landed.

“Shoot,” Charlie said. “They covered the chimneys.”

“Over here,” Charlene squeaked, putting her claws on the gutter and looking down. “You see that vine on the wall? Next to it is a vent. Try to get in.”

Charlie studied the vine.  Then he hung off the gutter and dropped into it. “It’s holding,” he squeaked. “I’ll jump over.”

With an athletic swing, he landed on the vent and peeked in between the louvers. “It’s an attic,” he said. “Nobody there. Only a noisy machine and lots of dust.”

“Can you get in?” Charlene pressed, getting impatient because the clouds were turning dark, announcing another rain storm.

“Easy, girl, I’m trying.” Charlie put his claws on a lower louver and pressed his back against the upper one but there wasn’t much movement. “It’s hard,” he complained.

Charlene dropped into the vine. “Move right,” she said. “I’ll come over and we’ll try together.”

“Don’t!” Charlie warned, seeing the gardener coming with his loud sputtering mower. “Hang in there, I’ll come back.”

Both hung in the vine, hiding until the mower was gone. Charlie swung back to the vent, making room for Charlene. She followed and both pressed their shoulders in between the louvers and created a suitable opening to sneak inside.

“Not bad,” Charlene said. “Enough room to squat on the wood.”

“Sounds like a plan,” Charlie said. Just at that moment, a thunderclap blasted and a violent shower clattered on the roof and against the vent. The squirrel couple sat high and dry, hearing the gardener cursing and shutting off his mower.

“This is great,” Charlene said. “I can have my babies here.”

The night approached and Charlene gave birth to three little squirrels. Nicely protected from birds of prey and cold showers, Charlie and Charlene enjoyed peaceful family life. Early mornings Charlie ventured outside to get food from the yards.

Then one night the attic started getting spooky.

“Do you hear that, Charlie?” his wife asked, concerned.

A little cloud appeared and two mice peeked out.

 

 

“Hi,” one said. “I am Maxie, and I lived here before.”

“And I am Maxine,” the other mouse said. “We both lived here before, but we’re dead now. “

“What!” Charlie said, worried. “Are you ghosts?”

“They poisoned us,” Maxine said. “Me, Maxie and my babies. So mean.”

“Would they come here to kill us, too?” Charlene asked, looking scared at her babies.

“When they hear you squeaking, gnawing or grunting as you do, they’ll come after you,” Maxie said.

“Oh no!” Charlene cried. “Not now, the babies are too small yet to carry them outside. And that rotten weather.”

Suddenly the little cloud covered the mice again. “We’ll be back another time,” the squirrels heard. “We only get so much time.”

Charlie and Charlene shivered, hovering over their little ones, and tried to be as quiet as possible.

* * *

“Hi, John,” neighbor Kevin said. “Do you know you’ve got squirrels in your attic? Look up there.” Kevin pointed. “They creep through your vent.”

“I’ll be damned! We thought we were hearing noises.”

“You better get them out before they chew your wires.”

“The rascals!”

* * *

That night, my wife screamed. “John, John, the mice are back!”

Fast asleep, I woke up with a shock. “What, what, where, where? Can’t be, I killed them all.”

“There,” she hollered. “On the dresser!”

True. Maxie and Maxine sat there, enveloped in their half-open little hazy cloud, staring at us.

“I thought we killed you,” I said, in awe of seeing micey spooks.

“Murdered, you did,” Maxie emphasized.

“Our whole family,” Maxine whined.

“You weren’t paying rent, remember?” I tried to justify, feeling guilty. They looked so sweet. “And you were messing up things big time. Droppings all over, toilet paper chewed off, rice bags torn, sofas sullied, and I can go on.”

“Why not treat us more humanely?” Maxie asked. “Why leave us in the freezing cold while you’re happily warm inside?”

“Don’t do the same to those squirrels up there,” Maxine said. “They just had three lovely babies.”

“That’s why you came back spooking to tell us that?” my wife asked.

“We have to go now,” Maxie said. “They give us only so much time.”  The little cloud closed over them and they vanished in the dark.

“I think I had a nightmare,” my wife said.

“Me too,” and we went back to sleep.

* * *

The next day our favorite carpenter, painter, construction specialist and handyman, Yimy Romero, and I opened the attic door and looked in. And, yes, we saw them sitting up, their silhouettes visible against the outdoor light streaming in through the vent.

“We can take care of them,” Yimy said. “No problemo.”

“Let’s give them a month, their babies are still blind now,” I said. “I’ll send them an eviction notice.” I laughed.

“Oh, yeah? How’s that?” Yimy grinned.

“I think we have a communication channel.”

“Better throw some mothballs,” Yimy advised. “That’ll kill them.”

* * *

The following night, my wife poked my side. “I hear some rustling,” she whispered.

I sat up and the darling mice couple appeared again on the dresser, the little cloud surrounding them slowly opening up.

“What are you going to do?” Maxie asked.

“Chase them mice out!” my wife screamed, horrified.

“Okay, Maxie, Maxine, tell them four weeks, no more,” I said. “Now beat it and don’t come back next fall!”

* * *

A month later, Yimy came and we looked inside the attic again. Empty. Charlie and Charlene had moved out with their offspring. I cut the vine and Yimy’s grandson (his faithful help) pulled it down. With a long ladder, Yimy covered the vent with a thick mesh.

 

Charlie and Charlene now sit in the backyard, close to the high Holly shrubs, loving each other, nibbling on nuts, their babies roaming nearby.

Credits: David Gylland  (picture left); Val Vesa (picture right)

This story was inspired by Mark Spencer’s delightful book Ghost Walking. (Mark did some editing too)

Ghost Walking by [Spencer, Mark]

https://amzn.to/2xcINKS. (Kindle)

https://amzn.to/31WFk17 (Paper)

Advertisement:

Enchanting the Swan

https://amzn.to/2XvKMsx

“A beautiful story — full of suspense, drama, and enduring love centered around music. John Schwartz has created a whole world and a wonderful escape. The characters jump off the page with such personality and imagery that this book could make a great movie. Enchanting the Swan is a very enjoyable read, and I recommend it highly.” Neal Cary (Cellist -Professor – William&Mary)

“Enjoyed the book. Well written book. A very heartbreaking love story.” Vera Wilson

“Enchanting the Swan was a nice read, and a deviation from the predictable boy meets girl and falls in love formula. There were many turns in the book that are reminiscent of life in that they were off the path to the end result. The writing was very image evoking and it all made for a good story that kept me reading until the end. Looking forward to more from this author!” Amy

“A lively composition! The various moneyed people, their elaborately appointed living quarters, and their high-wheeling lifestyle add a dash of pizzazz.” Kirkus Reviews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A SCARY FLIGHT

beech on runway 

 

Our Beechcraft stood at Executive Airfield near Charleston in the glistering afternoon sun. Friends dropped us off after a weekend fishing off the South Carolina coast. We loaded our bags in the hull and walked back to the flight desk for weather information. Tom, my muscled friend from college and a Boeing 737 captain, and I drew up our flight plan. We had been flying the Beechcraft for several years now and enjoyed the fruits of our investments, going out each weekend if we could. I had been flying small planes since I was twenty-five. As I did well in my career as an investment banker, I could afford purchasing the aircraft. Tom pitched in as well.

“Fueling done?” asked Tom

“All fine. Here’s your invoice,” the attendant said. “Weather report OK, but you may hit some thunderstorms near your destination. Nothing to worry about.”

It was my turn to take the Beech back to Manassas in Northern Virginia, our hub. I started the engines, let them roar a few times, and taxied to the run way. Patrick Allen of Dreamstime.com took our picture. A few moments later we were airborne. Soon we would be home to tell the funny boat stories and show off our tanned bodies. Sunita, my wife, would be waiting anxiously. She would never come along. Andy, my son, and daughter Sonia, sometimes flew with us, but they were busy with parties this weekend. Besides, Sunita did not like them coming along. Tom was engaged to his umpteenth beauty, a smart girl from Manilla, but she felt terrified in small planes.

 

 

beachcraft flying

 

We were flying under visual flight rules in clear skies at an altitude of 9,500 feet, enjoying the scenery of fluffy clouds, the patches of forests and fields gliding by below us, the sonorous hum of the engines. As the weatherman had predicted, after about an hour and a half we began to experience some turbulence but the bright cumulus turned dark much faster than we heard.

Nuvole, vista aerea

Regenwolken am Himmel

Tom radioed Flight Watch for an update and they reported that conditions ahead were changing rapidly. I contacted Flight Service and activated our instrument flight plan, as visibility deteriorated fast. We contacted Air Traffic Control, and the Washington Center controller reported significant storms developing along our planned route. Tom and I discussed if we should return or reroute. But from the cockpit, the sky to the west looked darker and even more menacing. The controller suggested we proceed in northeastern direction to avoid the worst of the storms. Knowing they might have a better radar overview than we, we accepted the new course. It didn’t look much better, but at least it seemed less threatening.

reroute clouds

 

Then flying conditions got suddenly pretty rough. We could not see anything anymore because of the harsh rain and thick clouds. I asked Tom, who had more experience, to take over the controls. We were about twenty minutes from Manassas. The hazardous weather and fierce lightning was now all around us. Turbulence shook the aircraft pretty badly and the instruments beeped several warnings. Tom struggled to keep the aircraft level. The controller informed us of severe thunderstorm activity near Manassas. Tom sneered that it couldn’t be worse than what we were having already.

The controller said landing was still possible and instructed to descend to 4000 feet, but there the clouds were even darker. Lightning kept slicing through them.

Nuvole temporalesche illuminati dai lampi

Hail began to clatter and the turbulence became increasingly violent. Then the aircraft experienced a sudden loss of 2000 feet. “Damn! Microburst!” yelled Tom to the tower. “Loosing speed going down!”  We were far too low, still half a mile from the runway and facing tough headwinds. I led the landing gear down at about 100 knots. Tom applied full throttle to gain height but the aircraft continued to be pushed down. We saw the ground approaching fast. Tom tried to pull up again and level but the Beech veered abruptly to the left in strong gale winds and the nose pitched downward. We hit the ground, skidded and spiraled several times with tremendous shocks, and came to a very rough halt. My seat broke loose or cracked, I didn’t know what happened, but I felt a terrible pain in my back. Luckily no fire broke out and the canopy was still intact, but rain, hail, lightning and thunder continued unabated. Tom leaned forward over his stick, his shoulder hugged in a forward position. I couldn’t move.

“Tom!” I screamed. “The hell wake up man! I feel like I’m dying.”

I noticed a slight shrug in his shoulders, thank God he was alive.

“Tom!” I yelled again.

He came through slowly. His hair was bloodied and his lips were cut. “Come on, John, don’t panic! The tower knows. The meds are coming. Hold on!”

We tried to loosen our seatbelts but everything was twisted. My vision blurred and my senses numbed. The last thing I heard were the ambulance sirens. Thank God! I just hoped they would be in time to get us out before the plane blew up.

* * *

We woke up in a bright white hospital room. Sunita stood near my bed, with the kids, tears in her eyes, but so glad I was alive. Tom’s fiancée, with her typical Philippine name, Mahalina, stood at Tom’s bed, holding his hand. He looked like a Sikh and a surgeon with his head in a ball of white bandage.

tom-1  Paul-1a

“You guys are very lucky,” Sunita said.  She wore her black hat as if she had been preparing for my funeral.  “Better leave that flying to the birds.”

I laughed, Tom grinned painfully. He couldn’t move his face.

“Yes,” he mumbled through his bandage. “Flying is for the birds.”

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A NAUGHTY ROMANCE

 

John at 18 -2

 

This is Frank, the young inventive, entrepreneurial banker on a year-long assignment in Geneva. He wants to practice piano. His boss, Olivier, invites him home to play on their baby grand. Olivier’s young and charming wife, Chantal, about his age, develops a crush on Frank, but does so with a specific purpose in mind.

This juicy story is told in “A Naughty Romance” available on Amazon.com under Kindle Books!

Here is Frank’s bank, the building with the red roof:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

situated at the beginning of the Rhone River that flows into France from Lake Geneva. Across the bridge, the rive droite, are the great hotels and luxury apartments overlooking the lake.

View of the city and Lake Geneva, Switzerland

And Frank is dreaming of Chantal, playing for her when hubby Olivier goes skiing and she stays home because she hurt her ankle in a ski fall.

Sexy woman with glass of wine

Well, it is not exactly happening the way Frank dreams, but maybe it was like this?

fr et ch

And this is how it became

Cover of Naughty  Cover of Naughty Cover of Naughty

Read the story on Amazon.com under Kindle books: ONLY 99 CENTS! Can’t go wrong with that!

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Bye for now, John

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